Austerlitz and an Empire’s End: Napoleon and the Dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire

Written by Daniel Sharp   2 December 1805: a battle takes place that was to enshrine Napoleon Bonaparte’s reputation as a genius military tactician and which would forever change the map and future of Europe. This battle would end the thousand-year-old Holy Roman Empire and would spell the end of the Third Coalition mounted by the European powers against France. This battle was the Battle … Continue reading Austerlitz and an Empire’s End: Napoleon and the Dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire

The Meiji Restoration and its Consequences: 150 Years On

Written by Travis Aaroe   True isolation was not possible for any country during the age of imperialism, although few tried harder than Japan under Shogunate rule. Ever since the decisive Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 which heralded the Tokugawa clan’s dominion over the country, Japan had been artificially cut off from the outer world under the ‘Sakoku’ policy of national seclusion. While it is … Continue reading The Meiji Restoration and its Consequences: 150 Years On

Understanding the foundations of India’s democratic tradition in the postcolonial era

Written by Shruti Venkatraman The recent release of Indian politician Shashi Tharoor’s book, Inglorious Empire, advocating for greater awareness of the blood-soaked history of India’s colonial past under British rule, and the release of the film Viceroy’s House, which was heavily criticized for portraying events covering the final months before Indian independence under Lord Mountbatten through an anglicized lens, have prompted discussion of the way … Continue reading Understanding the foundations of India’s democratic tradition in the postcolonial era

The Role of Colonial Legacies in the 2017 Zimbabwe Crisis

By Carissa Chew This article, which is informed by two public lectures about the Zimbabwean political crisis that were held at the University of Edinburgh in the week beginning 20 November, discusses the role of colonial legacies in recent Zimbabwean political affairs. Firstly, this article provides a summary of the Zimbabwean crisis for the reader who is not familiar with the timeline of events. Secondly, … Continue reading The Role of Colonial Legacies in the 2017 Zimbabwe Crisis

Viking Zombies – A Research Seminar by Dr Clare Downham

Written by Grace Young Vikings and zombies generally are not things one would naturally think of in the same sentence. They are certainly not things most people would associate with Scotland, either. However, this is exactly what Dr. Clare Downham of the University of Liverpool gave a seminar on. For clarification, while Downham really was talking about actual Vikings, she was not actually discussing brain-eating, … Continue reading Viking Zombies – A Research Seminar by Dr Clare Downham

Notes from the Late Antique and Medieval Postgraduate Society on Experiencing Medieval Spaces

Written by Daniel Sharp On Monday 23 October, I attended a meeting presented by the Late Antique and Medieval Postgraduate Society. The society is conducting a series of research seminars this year, in which papers and research is presented and discussed. The meeting I attended was not, unfortunately, a seminar – it was a general roundtable discussion and a meeting for administrative decisions to be … Continue reading Notes from the Late Antique and Medieval Postgraduate Society on Experiencing Medieval Spaces

Austrian Responses to German Nationalism

Written by Travis Aaroe The Austrian Empire was a multi-ethnic domain ruled over by the Habsburg dynasty. After the Congress of Vienna, which ended the Napoleonic Wars, the Empire stretched from Lombardy, Venetia and modern-day Austria in the west to Hungary in the east and, from Croatia in the south to Bohemia and Galicia in the north. There was little natural unity amongst the subject … Continue reading Austrian Responses to German Nationalism

Meg Foster’s ‘Black Douglas’: The Bushranger and the Man (Diaspora Research Seminar Review)

Written by Lewis Twiby On Tuesday 31 October, Meg Foster, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of New South Wales, gave a research seminar on the infamous bushranger Black Douglas. This was in an effort to highlight her research in this overlooked aspect of Australian national history. During Australia’s gold rush of the 1850s, a new brand of criminal named the ‘bushranger’ emerged and set … Continue reading Meg Foster’s ‘Black Douglas’: The Bushranger and the Man (Diaspora Research Seminar Review)

Classical influences on Shakespeare’s ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’

Written by Bella Howard-Vyse To say that the Classical influences on the Modern World are both underestimated and underappreciated would be an understatement. Despite the fact that 60 per cent of words in the English language derive from Latin, there are other less obvious connections between the two vastly different worlds: the Ancient and the Modern. The influence of Classical literature on more recent writers has … Continue reading Classical influences on Shakespeare’s ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’

The 1997 Hong Kong handover

By RETROSPECT JOURNAL Written by Emma Marriott In the summer of 1997, a ceremony was held in Hong Kong, marking the official transfer of sovereignty to the People’s Republic of China, ending 157 years of British rule. Chris Patten, Hong Kong’s last colonial governor, departed from the Government House in Hong Kong on the 1st July 1997, and made the historic and iconic trip back … Continue reading The 1997 Hong Kong handover

Thomas Jackson: The Stonewall of Confederate Honour

Written by Kevin Kempton. On 21 July 1861, Union Brigadier General Irvin McDowell fought against Confederate Brigadier General Pierre Gustave Toutant-Beauregard at First Bull Run (or First Manassas). As the Confederate lines began to crumble under McDowell’s heavy Union assault, a brigade arrived, providing significant reinforcements on Henry House Hill. Confederate Brigadier General Barnard Elliott Bee Jr., exhorted his own troops to re-form, realising that … Continue reading Thomas Jackson: The Stonewall of Confederate Honour

Pan-Africanism and Western Domination

Pan-Africanism and Western Domination

Written by Pablo Perez Ruiz. “Toussaint’s failure was the failure of enlightenment, not of darkness.” – C.L.R James, Black Jacobins. “This is where the African intellectual lives in paradoxical terms: powerful yet powerless.” – Toyin Falola, Nationalism and African Intellectuals. Pan-Africanism, when taken as a broad ‘group of movements’ with ‘no single nucleus’ and stemming from the experiences of the African diaspora, cannot be seen as a simple, reactive response … Continue reading Pan-Africanism and Western Domination